The Birth of TheLiteraryNet.com




           


Posted by Webmaster
For a while I’ve thought about sharing the history of this website , but for some strange reason I never pursued that endeavor. However, as I’ve continued to develop the website, I have learned a lot – more than one would expect to learn by operating a website. Not only have I learned different computer languages and other technical skills, but I have learned about organization, marketing, human psychology, and other things that accompany human interaction. As such, I have decided to share my experiences, which I feel you can benefit from as you learn about the details behind the operation of a social networking website. But before I begin discussing this website specifically, I will talk about my history with computers.

My Introduction to Computers
From my recollection, my first exposure to computers was around 6 years old when my mother brought a Macintosh home from work on the weekends. At the time it was one of the newest computers available to consumers, but is currently an artifact. Kids being raised today carry around more computer power in their smartphones than existed in that Macintosh. However, it was on that Macintosh that I was first exposed to typing and computing. The skills I gained kept me in a more advanced state with regard to computer technology than most of my peers. I have enjoyed working with computers ever since.

When I was a teenager, my family purchased our first desktop computer. At the time, America Online was the premier internet service provider, and using a dial-up modem was the only way for people to connect to the internet. Broadband and Wi-Fi were nonexistent. The fastest internet speeds available to most consumers were 56kbps (1,000 bits per second) in comparison with the internet speeds of today, which are measured in mbps (1,000,000 bits per second). The average modern website loads in less than 5 seconds but would cause my old computer to stall. On my family’s first computer, it would take a much less technologically intense website nearly a minute to fully load. Despite that, I can recall the magical feeling I felt the first time I logged onto the internet. I was fascinated by the internet. The noisy, static filled sound of the dial-up modem enthralled me. And that interest in the emerging internet technology has remained with me, and became something I view as a way to support my entrepreneurial endeavors.

I’m a Good Writer
Reading has always been something that I enjoy. It has provided a means of escape where I could learn about many things on a variety of topics, and temporarily escape my own life to learn about the lives of others. In general, it can increase someone’s writing skills. I am certain that because I read a variety of material at an early age, including adult literary classics by Maya Angelou and Richard Wright, my writing ability was always superior to that of many of my peers.

In the 5th grade, my teacher forced me to enter a writing contest. Months later I had forgotten that I had entered and was surprised when I received a $25 check for winning the contest. My writing teachers throughout my schooling nearly always took a special interest in me. And despite being raised in an underprivileged environment, I outperformed my peers in the area of writing. I treasure my results from a mandatory test I took in high school, which stated that I scored higher than 89% of my peers throughout America in written expression.

Since high school, I have continued to develop my writing through academic research, societal commentary, and writing fictional novels. I have found writing to be soothing and relaxing, as it enables me to express myself however I want, while enlightening others with what I say. I am sure that many other writers feel the same way. Independence and doing things my way is something that I always seek to do.

Agents, editors, publicists, publishers, and even bookstore clerks often seek to interfere with free expression. After I finished my books, I self-published them because I did not want anyone trying to control how I told my stories. Accompanying that mentality was a revolutionary idea. The literary industry needs to change so that unconnected people with good stories to tell are able to draw attention to their work without the help of the literary establishment.

How I Became a Web Developer
While in college, I was dealing with outside issues that distracted me. And because of that, I took two semesters off. During my time away from college, I looked for something around the house to read and found a book that looked interesting. Special Edition Using HTML 4 was a book given to my mother by her employer, which was an information technology training company. I began reading and studying the book, and was introduced to the world of computer programming and web development.

I was fascinated by web development, and enjoyed building websites. Some of the websites I built served as platforms for me to express myself through writing. Additionally, I built another website that I monetized and hoped to profit from. However, that website did not become profitable and I terminated it, and went back to college. But my interest in web development never ended.

After returning to college and graduating, life moved on. For nearly a decade I built no websites, nor worked on increasing my knowledge of computer programming. I regret that because the skills I could have developed would have been extremely beneficial to me, and my plans would be more advanced than they are now.

The Merging of Ideas
Spending my adult life working for someone else until retirement was never going to be my destiny. Since childhood I have always wanted to be a businessman, and because I have an independent spirit, I have aspired to be an entrepreneur. I have explored ideas on different types of businesses to create, tried and failed at them, but I never gave up. And when I saw The Social Network in 2010, I said to myself that I could do what Mark Zuckerberg had done. At that time I was working a stressful job, and when I became fed up with it and left in 2012, I began working earnestly on building an internet social network.

To develop a social networking website, the website must have a theme that it revolves around. As I’ve mentioned, people have complimented me on my writing ability, and I have written fictional novels. And because I had seen how hard it is to promote and market a book without the support of the literary machine, I decided to make the process easier for other authors. That would be accomplished by creating a centralized location that provides information about the literary industry, and facilitates networking and interaction between all actors involved in literature. Thus, www.TheLiteraryNet.com was born.

Knowing that I needed to expand my web development skills beyond HTML, I purchased PHP Solutions: Dynamic Web Design Made Easy, and studied it earnestly. PHP had been a relatively unknown programming language to me, but after studying it, I found it fairly easy to learn. It soon became the primary programming language for this website , and led to me learning other languages to supplement its operations.

The process of developing www.TheLiteraryNet.com has involved a lot of time, energy, effort, and studying. I have spent many long days and nights building the website, and troubleshooting problems that have arisen. Along the way I have been helped by others, and their assistance has been much appreciated. www.TheLiteraryNet.com continues to grow, and many lessons have been learned since its inception.

I will share the details of its history in future posts of this Behind the Scenes section.



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